Life in the Raw

When we moved into the bungalow, on the first afternoon we were there, Ann called me into the kitchen with a “look at this!”. I expected to see a dead body in the kitchen, or a hole in the floor, or something equally drastic, but she was calling me to see a cow in the adjacent field looking at us over the hedge. The farm at the end of the road is dairy and has around 140 milking friesians, who spend 3 or 4 days a week in “our” field.

cows

This is the view from the kitchen window.

As we got used to our new neighbours and enjoyed watching them during the spring to autumn, it struck us that it would be good if we could drink the milk that they produce. Well, as of yesterday, we can.

Since Christmas, the farmer has been constructing a new “porch” on the side of one of his barns, facing the road and I guessed that he might have been setting up to sell produce directly. On Saturday, a flyer was posted through the door to say that they are now selling raw milk from a vending machine and so we bought some on the way back from walking Betsy yesterday morning.

img_7566

The milk is obviously whole and not skimmed and is therefore creamier than we are used to, but it does have a lovely fresh taste. This is hardly surprising, given that only 5 hours before this photo was taken, it was still inside a cow! It tastes very odd in tea as we are used to drinking milk from the other end of the rawness scale (Cravendale skimmed), but it is really nice just as a drink or on cereals. Will definitely be buying regularly.

Raw milk has far more vitamins and minerals that pasteurised, and retains its beneficial bacteria, but does come with a very small risk of catching some horrid disease, such as TB. This is highly unlikely and, in my opinion, a risk worth taking to buy produce that could not be more local.

I will enjoy a glass or two looking out of the window at our neighbours when the weather improves and they can come back into our field.

I like living here. It’s good for you.

One thought on “Life in the Raw”

  1. Andy I got here from leica forum that linked to a blog.

    You’re a good photographer.

    I have a ridiculous number of Leicas mostly old screw mounts. My wife used to rag on me about it but now lets it be. I would sometimes think ” wow, am I like a Leica (do you see the redundancy? ) horder??? But it doesn’t effect me at all now.

    I saw your original forum post re elmar 3.5cm and hoods. The elmar 3.5cm and the hektor 2.8cm are my 2 absolute favorite leica lenses tho I do also like 35mm pre asph summilux too. About 8-9 years ago you’d read reviews of the little elmar from people like dante stella and they would say things like “junk, bad, what can expect from 4 elenents etc etc” they were very cheap then almost always under 100, sometimes 35-50 with hoods.

    I bought lots of them all years nickel and chrome. The deeper FLQOO hood imo works better than the FOOKH.

    The hoods are pricey now but they won’t get cheaper only go up as most leica stuff. The little hektor is up 5x 6x in the past 5-6 years better than the market. Imo a 3.5cm elmar under 200 is a BUY now.

    Take care. Your farmhouse looks cool. I like UK especially Isle of Wight.

    Mike

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